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Jan/Feb 2007

 
 
Contents
Sampling: A Showcase of Accessories
News & Notes from the Fiber World
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WEB EXCLUSIVE GALLERY:
Sampling: A Showcase of Accessories

The Sampling department of our January/February 2007 issue features wearable accessories. Taking a variety of shapes and sizes from the traditional to the outlandish, these artworks are the perfect counterpart to any outfit. Here we show additional works by our featured artists.

Anastasia Azure
Anna Osmer Andersen
Nora Fok
Natalya Pinchuk
Camilla Prasch
Marga van der Bos

Anastasia Azure, a resident artist at the Appalachian Center for Craft, sees jewelry as an architectural exterior surrounding the body and sees the seamless continuity of a circle as providing containment and protection.

(1) Autumn Bracelet #1, 2004; copper, steel, sterling silver, rayon/cotton, citrines, garnets; doubleweave, ikat, roller printed, riveted, stone setting; 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" x 2 1/4". Photo: Hap Sakwa.

(2) Winter Bracelet #2, 2004; silk, sterling silver; doubleweave, ikat, indigo dyed, roller printed, stone setting; 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" x 2 1/4". Photo: Hap Sakwa.

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Anna Osmer Andersen’s work focuses on scale. She believes that the tactile, padded nature of her Chains and Pearls series lends to the work being wearable even with its exaggerated size.

(1) Light Blue Chain, 2004; vintage cotton tablecloth; three-dimensional patchwork. Photo by the artist.

(2) Red/Creme Chain, 2004; vintage linen tea towel; three-dimensional patchwork. Photo by the artist.

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Nora Fok links natural forms and mathematics in her sculptural pieces. She sees both as artistic expression in their own right.

(1) Calculator, 2002; pigmented nylon; woven, knitted. A fully functional woven abacus. Photo: Frank Hills.

(2) Condensation, 2000; clear nylon, acrylic balls; knitted. Photo: Frank Hills.

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Natalya Pinchuk uses wool felt to represent the visceral qualities of humanity—specifically hair, pores, and genitalia—that she feels are masked by fashion and consumerism. She feels that through her felted jewelry she can reveal the body and its sexual drives.

(1) Naughty, 2005; wool; felted. Photo: Tirzah Roze.

(2) How Many Do You Have? 2005; wool; felted. Photo: Tirzah Roze.

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Camilla Prasch challenges the perception and experience of jewelry. Using lightweight commonplace materials, she creates “space consuming” jewelry with movement that becomes as much of the experience as the form.

(1) Handschuhkette Leder (glovechain skin), 2004; calfskin, thread; sewn. This piece is part of Prasch’s Angezogen (dressed) series of accessories that are between jewelry and clothing. Photo: Elizabeth Heltoft/6 Agency.

(2) Verlängert Fünf (lengthened five), 2004; nylon string, nylon snaps, white silicone disks; sewn, knot-bound. As a reaction to our fast-paced world, this bracelet creates a time-out for the hand. Photo by the artist.

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Marga van der Bos’s original creations under the name VANDERBOS are both “body wraps” and sculptures and are a departure from the traditional hats she has made for the last twenty years. The pieces are made only in black, gray, brown, and off-white; the neutral colors emphasize the form that is at the center of the design.

(1) VANDERBOS embracement #18, 2004–2006; industrial felt; flat pattern sewn and steam molded. Photo: Jan Boeve.

(2) VANDERBOS embracement #14, 2004–2006; industrial felt; flat pattern sewn and steam molded. Photo: Jan Boeve.

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