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Fiberarts - Summer 2011
Summer 2011

 
Fiberarts - Summer 2011
 
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Contents
Meet the Winners of the 2011 Fiberarts Reader’s Choice Studio Contest
Honorable Mentions from the 2011 Fiberarts Reader’s Choice Studio Contest
Emerging Artists Showcase
Updated exhibition and competition listings

Merill Comeau

More Works of a Healing Nature

Merill Comeau studies and interprets nature through the exploration of formal landscape imagery and paintings. Using 90 percent repurposed materials, including discarded clothing, vintage linens, and artists’ brush-cleaning rags, she creates beautiful and unified scenes from the natural world in fabric. From her Concord, Massachusetts, studio, Comeau thoughtfully chooses her palette and scraps by sifting through material discards often owned by someone she knows. Inspired by a close friend and his partner, her 2010 series My Heart Bleeds for You investigates nature’s cacophony and chaos by “representing our shared human experience of coping with a complex world.” She artfully stitches together incongruous fabric snippets, allowing her artwork to sing notes of rebirth and new life. www.merillcomeau.com.


 
 
 

ABOVE: Merill Comeau, Fragments of Eden I (with detail below left), 2010, painted and printed vintage linens and fabrics, repurposed clothing snippets, artist’s brush cleaning rags, plastic net vegetable bags; machine-stitched;12' x 6½'. Photos: Susan Byrne.

Merill Comeau, Fragments of Eden II (with detail above right), 2010; painted and printed vintage linens and fabrics, repurposed clothing snippets, artist’s brush cleaning rags, commercial fabrics, plastic net vegetable bags, machine-stitched; 10' x 5'. Photos: Susan Byrne.

www.merillcomeau.com.



Gabriella D’Italia

More Works of a Healing Nature

Contemporary quilt artist Gabriella D’Italia employs repetition and patterning in her new series Aggregate Indexes. Primarily monochromatic with simplistically shaped patterns, her newest pieces explore the perpetual and undirected nature of change. D’Italia mends these seemingly disparate modes of thinking in intimate designs, enacting transformation through the recurring arrangement of form and color. Beginning with raw strips of cut fabric, her small-scale quilts are layered with labor-intensive traditional techniques such as handpiecing, handstitching, and embroidery. In each composition the artist embraces the relationship between making and materials to convey an idiosyncratic sense of time and place. www.gabrielladitalia.com.

 
 
 
Top: Gabriella D’Italia, Aggregate Index–Purple-Pink (with detail), 2011; cotton, cotton batting; machine-pieced, handquilted, handembroidered; 38" x 28" x 2". Photos: Cameron Crawford.

Gabriella D’Italia, Aggregate Index–Orange-Grey (with detail), 2011; cotton, cotton batting; machine-pieced, handquilted, handembroidered; 16" x 20" x 2". Photos: Cameron Crawford.

www.gabrielladitalia.com

Erin Endicott

More Works of a Healing Nature

Vintage pieces of fabric passed down from generations of women in Erin Endicott’s family are the canvases she uses to stitch “inherited wounds.” Her recent series Healing Sutras (sutra–the Sanskrit word meaning to stitch a thread or line that holds things together) intrigues and captivates viewers with astonishing textile symbolism. Endicott’s pieces are representations of the accumulation of negative energy around an original moment of psychological trauma. She stains the repurposed fabric with walnut ink to create organic surface designs reminiscent of dried blood. The healing begins as she expertly hand embroiders veins, roots, and cellular seed shapes into and around the woundlike imagery. “By bringing these dark areas into the light, by making them visible,” Endicott explains, “I think we can heal these wounds, discover their origins and how they insinuate themselves into our lives.” www.erinendicottart.com.

 
 
 

Top: Erin Edicott, Healing Sutra #10 (with detail), 2010; antique fabric, thread, walnut ink; handembroidered, stained; 19" x 21". Photos: Glenn Hudson.

Erin Edicott, Healing Sutra #7 (with detail), 2010; antique fabric, thread, walnut ink; handembroidered, stained; 15" x 15". Photos: Glenn Hudson

www.erinendicottart.com

Hannah Streefkerk

More Works of a Healing Nature

Dutch artist Hannah Streefkerk is stitching up nature. In a large-scale installation at the Land Art Biënnale 2010 Valkenswaard, Netherlands, Streefkerk “restored” approximately thirty trees in an area called de Malpie. To create the appearance that textile bandages were actually stitched into the trees, she drilled tiny holes to nail yarn into the damaged bark. Through her land art restorations, Streefkerk brings awareness to trees injured by both natural and human influences. The artist skillfully incorporates traditional embroidery techniques into these site-specific outdoor interventions, triggering a unique dialogue between observer and landscape as viewers walk around and in between the artistically “healed” trees. www.waanwaar.nl.

 
 
 
Above: Hannah Streefkerk, Tree Restoration (with detail), 2010; yarn; handstitched. Photos: Hannah Streefkerk.

www.waanwaar.nl

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